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MINI 3-Door Hatch

The independent definitive MINI 3-Door Hatch video review
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    SUPERSIZE ME (some text hidden)

    By Jonathan Crouch

    This third generation MINI 3-Door Hatch has been usefully improved - though not beyond recognition. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

    Ten Second Reviewword count: 30

    Fresh technology, smarter connectivity and sharper looks are amongst the highlight changes made to this revised MINI 3-Door Hatch model. If you liked it before, you'll really like it now.

    Backgroundword count: 205

    For a car that's been so successful, the modernday MINI seems to have nevertheless disgruntled quite a few people. "Look at the size of it," snort its detractors. "That's no Mini. It's a front-wheel drive BMW in disguise," they scoff. They might well have a point and if you're to embrace and enjoy the current day 3-Door hatch version of this MINI, it's best you think of it as a car completely different to the original, merely cribbing some of its design cues. That's because the modern era MINI has grown, since it was re-launched at the turn of the century and even more since this MK3 model was first introduced in 2014. That it now measures 3821mm in length and it's 1727mm wide which will have some up in arms, but let's keep a sense of proportion. It's still shorter than a 1990s Ford Fiesta, a vehicle hardly recognised as a leviathan amongst cars. The key themes in developing this current car have been to retain the look while improving quality, refinement and efficiency. Some smart technology has crept in which is sure to be popular. Although it looks much the same, be under no illusions: this latest model is a massively improved vehicle.

    Driving Experienceword count: 208

    The key update with this most recently revised model is that it's now possible to order it with adaptive damping - an important option given this car's go-kart-like firm ride, especially with larger wheels. Otherwise, it's as you were, all based on a chassis that's BMW's clever UKL1 platform, which also underpins a number of front-wheel drive BMW models. There's a base 1.5-litre model, the One, with 102hp, but if you want your MINI to have a bit of zip, you'll need to start your search for one at Cooper level, where an uprated version of that 1.5-litre petrol unit offers an eager 136hp, gets you to 62mph in 7.9s and arguably represents the sweet spot in the range. Then there's the Cooper S, with a 2.0-litre petrol engine putting out a useful 192hp, a lot of poke for something so small, with 62mph just 6.8s away. The flagship option in the mainstream range is the 231hp John Cooper Works variant. MINI also offers the option of a 7-speed dual clutch auto gearbox. In recent times, the brand says that minor changes have been made to its TwinPower Turbo Technology across the board, improving engine electronics, oil supply, intake air ducting, the cooling set-up and the exhaust system.

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    Pictures (high res disabled)

    Statistics (subset of data only)

    Min

    Max

    Price:

    £11,870.00

    £23,605.00

    Insurance group:

    8

    36

    CO2 (g/km):

    99

    165

    Urban Mpg:

    28

    67.3

    Extra Urban Mpg:

    53.3

    80.7

    Combined Mpg:

    39.8

    74.3

    Weight (kg):

    1145

    1260

    Scoring (subset of scores)

    Category: Small Runabouts

    Performance
    70%
    Handling
    70%
    Comfort
    70%
    Space
    60%
    Styling, Build, Value, Equipment, Depreciation, Handling, Insurance and Total scores are available with our full data feed.

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